GurnetSaquish.com
Fire Safety










Few things scare owners more than fire.  Now with advancements in technology, costs for equipment going down and basic fire preparedness education we can provide you with important information on how to protect your home and your possessions in the event of a fire.  Select the link to go to the FIRE SAFETY page.


There are many risks to fighting fires on your own and operating any type of fire fighting equipment.  You operate that equipment just as you read the information on this page and this website, at your own risk. - ed

PLYMOUTH  FIRE DEPARTMENT
G Edward Bradley - Fire Chief
LaDonna Osbourne - Office Manager

114 Sandwich Street
Plymouth, MA 02360
PH 508 830-4213
Emergency Dial 911
Hours:  M-F 8a-4:30p


MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF FIRE SERVICES

Select the image at left to go to the Division of Fire Safety, formerly the official site of the State Fire Marshal.  There are dozens of resources and links for fire education including fire prevention training, code compliance and more when you visit this page.  Find additional information on the FIRE SAFETY page.

PREVENTING FIRE

  • Keep fuel sources (anything combustible) away from ignition sources
  • Monitor equipment on a regular basis. 
  • Replace aging electrical equipment
  • Always have your electrical system installed by a licensed technician.  
  • Remove any loose wood from around or near your property
  • Make sure that any open fires are manned at all times. 
  • Never leave an open fire unattended and keep a shovel nearby to manage the fire. 
  • Make sure that the wind is blowing away from structure before starting any open fires. 
  • Always extinguish open fires before  leaving the area.

"DRILL BABY DRILL"

Once a year in the Spring after you've checked all your equipment get the family together and execute a fire drill.  Make sure:
  • Everyone knows how to use a fire extinguisher.
  • There is a plan of escape from each room
  • There is a plan to get help from neighbors
  • There is a plan for a bucket brigade
  • You have a first aid kit
  • You understand how to treat burns

IN THE EVENT OF FIRE DIAL 911


Fire response times are generally more than 40 minutes.  And while that may be too long to save the burning structure it's early enough to prevent catastrophic fire from sweeping through the more populated areas of the community.  CALL 911 in an emergency.  While Gurnet-Saquish resides in Plymouth County so too do Duxbury and Marshfield.  The forest fire fighting units from Duxbury and Marshfield are usually first responders due to the "mutual aid" agreement between fire departments. CALL 911 in an emergency.  Prevention is important and understanding where the fire stations are, how they operate and even managing your own equipment is critical to fighting fire but don't forget to CALL 911 in an emergency.  You can never have too much help responding to a fire on the beach even if response times are long.




FIGHTING FIRE

Fighting fire is extremely dangerous and serious injury or death can result if you're not qualified to fight the fire.  There arer any number of reasons not to fight a fire and you should be aware of the serious risks.  To fight fire you must understand fire.  Oxygen + heat + fuel (combustible material) combine to create fire.  These three things are known as "the fire triangle."  Fire extinguishers are designed to remove one of the three sides of the "fire triangle" in order to extinguish the fire.

Fire extinguishers are given different classifications based on the type of fuels they are designed to extinguish.  Using the wrong fire extinguisher on a fire can make matters worse.  Here are the four basic classes of fuel:

  • CLASS A - Wood, paper, cloth, trash, plastics and other combustible materials that are not metals
  • CLASS B - Flammable liquids including petroleum based products, gasoline, grease and oil are examples of Class B fuels
  • CLASS C - Electrical equipment including transformers, inverters and anything that's plugged in
  • CLASS D - Metals including aluminum and magnesium are Class D fuels
Experts will say never fight a fire if you don't know what's burning, the fire is spreading rapidly and you think it might not be a good idea.  Even with slow response times it's important to stay away from dangerous situations.  The best chance you have is early when the fire first ignites.

The instructions on most fire extinguishers include aiming the nozzle at the base of the fire and sweeping back and forth. 
  • Buy new fire extinguishers each year and check old ones to be sure that they are fully charged. 
  • Keep an extra fire extinguisher in your vehicle if you come upon a fire. 
  • Car fires occur when vehicles get stuck in the sand and dry seaweed or beach grass ignites when in contact with the catalytic converter or other hot engine parts.  Turn off any vehicle that has become stuck and assess the situation before proceeding.

LEARN ABOUT RISK OF FIRE WITH SOLAR AND WIND POWERED HOMES

The Residential Modular Construction Concerns & Fire Fighter Safety & Emergency Response for Solar Power Systems report prepared for the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services on November 3, 2010 addresses concerns, regulations and case studies of businesses and residences that caught fire due to issues with photovoltaic and wind powered electrical systems.  If you have a home with alternative energy read this report from the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services.


FIND A FIRE STATION BEFORE YOU NEED ONE

There are now three fire stations in the community.  Chances are your contributions helped fund them.  Do yourself a favor and seek out community leaders to find out how to access and use the equipment.  How quickly can you access the equipment, get it set up and running?  Ask for training and time yourself.  How long does it take to get the water to come out?  How much comes out and how quickly?  What are the best practices for ensuring that the equipment is in good working order?  Know as much as you can about how to use existing equipment.  At the very least you should understand how the equipment operates and how many people are required to activate it.  Some helpful instructions are included below.

BUILD A FIRE STATION

Owners with wells, holding tanks and access to sea water can now purchase and build their own fire stations for a couple thousand dollars.  Teaming up with your neighbor is a great way to offset costs and protect adjacent structures.  The more residents that purchase the same equipment the easier it is for everyone to operate.  Items needed for your own fire station include:
  • gas pump
  • strainer/filter
  • intake hose
  • fire hose
  • nozzle
  • cart 

PORTABLE FIRE STATION KIT
                                                                                                                                                                                     $979.99

This All Hands Fire Safety Kit includes the The Honda Generator, Honda Water Pump Hose Kit and the Akron Brass Spanner Wrench and Nozzle.

  • HONDA WMP20XA WATER PUMP
    Specially designed for transferring chemicals and other liquids.

    FEATURES & BENEFITS
    * Honda Overhead Valve Engine
    * Oil Alert
    * Specially Designed for Transferring Chemicals and Other Liquids
    * 2" Suction/Discharge Ports
    * Spring Mounting Feet
    * Capacity of 220 Gallons per Minute
    * 2 Year Residential Warranty
    * 2 Year Commercial Engine & 3 Month Pump Component Warranty


  • HONDA WATER PUMP HOSE KIT

    Includes 20 foot green suction hose, 50 foot blue discharge Hose and 3/8" hole strainer

    2" NPT





  • ACCESSORY PACK & NOZZLE INCLUDED







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